23rd October 2020

Take a tour of our Gurkha Residential Home in Pokhara

In Nepal, we run two pioneering Residential Homes for Gurkha veterans and widows

Our two Residential Homes provide round-the-clock care to Gurkha veterans and widows who would otherwise struggle to live alone. With no comparable facility in Nepal, they set the standard of care for the elderly. They combine the best in western geriatric care with an eastern culture of respect for elders.

Take the tour of our Residential Home in Pokhara Nepal

Watch the video below to see a tour, given by Residential Home nurse Aastha Strestha, of our Pokhara Residential Home. Meet the Gurkha veterans and widows we care for, and see the facilities we provide them with:

How we helped Padam Kumari

One of our most lively residents, Padam Kumari had a tragic upbringing. When she was just 11 years old, her parents and grandparents all died from cholera within a year of each other, leaving Padam and her eight siblings to fend for themselves.

Later that year, her eldest two siblings moved away to get married, leaving Padam in charge of her six younger siblings, running the house, and looking after the animals. This was a very unhappy and difficult time for her. They sold milk and ghee and she learnt to cook by watching her neighbours.

When she turned 16, Padam met her husband Rifleman Bhakta Bahadur Sunuwar, a soldier from the 10th Gurkha Rifles. He had been injured in India during the war and had been medically discharged. They had 12 children – nine daughters and three sons together. Bhakta sadly died, leaving Padam alone with the children.

Padam moved into our Residential Home in Kaski, near Pokhara, seven years ago and says it is “heaven”. She makes Chakkatis (cushions made of corn husk and recycled plastics), loves dancing and is learning to write her name. Bhakta her husband taught her to count to 20 in English many years ago and she is very proud that she can still remember the numbers. One of her relatives is also a resident and he has been teaching her Nepali letters.

Padam, though not the youngest resident, says that she is the fittest and the strongest so she should be the one to meet and greet all the people who visit the Residential Home.

 

“We cannot change what is written in our destiny neither can we pass on what is destined for us to others. We have to live with our deeds and whatever is meant to happen.”

“Till you speak to others they remain strangers, once you communicate you start loving even strangers like your own. Just speaking to each other is not enough, if your thoughts are not compatible then that relationship and love will get torn or will end with time.”

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