The village of Gitachaur is home to 32 families. It's extremely remote and can only be reached by a 21-hour drive and then a day’s trek from our headquarters in Pokhara. The villagers are poor and most men of working age have moved to India.

Until the Trust’s intervention, women and children collected water from ponds and open streams. As these were also used by animals and for washing and bathing, the water was dirty and waterborne illnesses were rife.

Life without clean water

One villager described her typical day: every morning, Bhagawati Singh would get up at 5.00am to walk for an hour through dense forest to the nearest water source.

She would then have to make the treacherous return journey carrying heavy water jugs. In one place, she had to negotiate a rocky cliff so steep that she feared for her life every time she crossed it.

Bhagawati had to repeat this long and dangerous walk several times a day to collect enough water for the family and her cattle. When she was unable to go she would send her three children, which prevented them from attending school.

Enter the GWT

Following a request for help, the Trust’s Rural Water and Sanitation Programme has now installed a water tap and toilet outside each home and a water tank to supply the entire village.

I cannot express my happiness in words; I feel heavenly comfort.

   Bhagawati Singh on the completed water project

Villagers have been taught about personal and community hygiene and how to prevent waterborne diseases, while a Community Health Worker has been recruited to maintain sanitation in the village now that our staff have moved onto other projects. 

It cost us around £10,000 to provide this life-changing water system. Gitachaur Village is just one of 80 projects the Trust will be undertaking this year.

Clean Water and Sanitation

Find out more about our water aid in rural Nepal.

The Trust at a glance

A brief summary of what we do and our plans for the coming years.

Take a look at an infographic covering the Trust's work in 2014/15.